How To

Blood Cleanup

Washing our blood products off of your skin, sets or out of clothes is very easy:

  1. Remove and dispose of any excess blood.
  2. Rinse with hot water. In many cases this is all that needs to be done. Cold water will work as well, it just takes a lot longer.
  3. For thinner fabrics or very fibrous materials detergents will be needed to get the remainder of the blood out. Be sure that if you are placing in a wash machine there is plenty of room for the water to flow through the fabric. Overloading will negatively affect the removal process.

That’s it! We have tested with various fabrics after six months of setting and have still had success. If you have any questions please contact us.

For further detail (and a laugh or two) see our Super-De-Duper Secret Blood Cleanup Instructions.

General Tips for Blood Effects

  • Blood will steal focus. Be completely sure the effect is necessary to progress the story or the moment will be lost.
  • Lighting and costumes colors will change the way the blood looks onstage. Be sure to take a look at your effects under the lighting and with the costumes that will be used for the show to avoid unpleasant surprises.
  • Water rehearsals are great and quick to clean up, but keep in mind that water behaves very differently than the blood unless the blood is cut very thin. For our Blood Jam product, if you mix 1 tbsp blood with 3-4 tbsp water you will get a suitably runny effect.
  • Bright red blood will give a quicker and deeper psychological shock to the audience if used quickly, unexpectedly and/or in small amounts.
  • Dark red blood is best for larger effects and/or effects that are onstage longer.
  • The blood effect does not have to come immediately after the injury. Bleeding later, especially if there are lines, often has a better effect and result.
  • When using blood bags use the cheapest folding sandwich bags possible. Tie in a simple knot to create pressure on the blood (tape usually falls off and does not create good enough pressure) and aim by directing the seam of the bag in the direction you want the blood to go.
  • Keep it simple. If the effect gets too complex the likelihood of a mistake increases. Actors have enough going on without having to add a bulky or tricky contraption to deliver the perfect blood spurt.

Tips on Mixing and using Blood Jam

  • For quick, easy mixing, use warm water or put the water and blood in the microwave for 7 second intervals then stir.
  • If you want an effect to stay on the skin and run use the Blood Jam as is to create a base. Then mix 1 tbsp blood with 1-2 tsp water and apply to the top of the base.
  • If you need to pre-mix the blood effects for more than a few days use vodka instead of water. The alcohol will prohibit bacteria and fungal growth.
  • To adjust flavor add a flavor extract to the blood being used.
  • You can get the blood to simulate coagulation by using the blood in its original thickness but as hot as comfortably possible before deploying. The blood will become runny when heated and the outer edge will cool faster than the inside making the blood slow down, pool, and return to its original thickness as it cools.
  • Using chocolate syrup with the blood will enhance the browning effect of the blood as it dries. Be aware, however, that the chocolate syrup may stain.

Using Blood Bags

Blood bags are the most popular and most often used way to deliver a blood effect on stage or screen. They are very simple to put together, hide and use.